World Wide Wednesday, July 30, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Collecting Information on Your Adoptive Child’s History: Whether you adopted your child at the age of 3 or 15, your child comes with his or her own life experiences that are different from yours. Often there have been many adults working to assure your child’s safety and wellbeing. Unfortunately, despite social workers’ best efforts, sometimes the details of a child’s life can be lost as that child travels from his birth family into foster care and then into adoptive placement. It’s important for adoptive parents to obtain as many details about their child’s life as possible and waiting years later to obtain those details can be difficult if not impossible. This workbook was written by DePaul Family Services to guide
    adoptive parents in obtaining those details that are often hidden in files and in people’s memories.
  • 7 Ways to Give Your Child a History: All of us spend at least some time wondering who we are and why we are. For a child who has faced
    many moves and a chaotic life before adoption, these are difficult questions to answer. But as elusive as the answers may be, they are vital as the child matures into adulthood. In “7 Ways to Give Your Child a History” — published in Adoptive Families — Gregory Keck and Regina Kupecky share seven activities from their book, Adopting the Hurt Child, to help any child adopted beyond infancy, whether from U.S. foster care or another country, to understand and integrate his past.
  • Agency Liability: What Adoption Service Providers and Adoptive Families Need to Know: The adoption process involves liability in multiple areas, including financial accountability, information disclosure, communication with clients, and the actions and supervision of employees. In the July 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, Michele Jackson explains the current requirements for licensed agencies for the benefit of both adoption service providers and prospective adoptive families.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

Jockey Being Family Conference – Pieces of Me: The Puzzle of Identity

 

Front PanelHave you ever felt as though you don’t belong? Maybe with a group of people or in a particular scene or setting? For children and youth who have been adopted, feeling as though they don’t belong or fit in can sometimes grow into questions about who they are as a person.

Every person who has been adopted experiences his or her adoption journey in different ways; but there are common themes that include:

  • peer pressure and bullying
  • adoptee loyalty and thoughts about searching for biological family members
  • grief and/or trauma
  • attachment challenges
  • intrusive questions

The Jockey Being Family Conference, Pieces of Me: The Puzzle of Identity, will provide both parents and their children (ages 6-17) who have been adopted with an opportunity to explore adoption identity.

Children and youth will spend a portion of their day with Jaclyn Skalnik, a transracial internationally adopted person, with the goal of leaving at the end of the day with a better understanding of their adoption story, feelings of curiosity about their adoption exploration, and stronger self-esteem through education and emotional support. When not in session with Jaclyn, children and youth will spend time engaging in arts projects and games with fellow adoptees; connecting with one another in a safe, supportive, and fun environment.

Parents and caregivers will also have a session with Jaclyn, addressing common thoughts, questions, and struggles that children who were adopted may experience. By sharing stories, experiential exercises, and role playing, Jaclyn will provide:

  • recommendations of tangible ways for parents and caregivers to connect or stay connected to their children through realistic discussions
  • tips on how families can establish a community of networking to support their children in ways beyond their own parenting abilities
  • suggestions on how to help their children feel health, strong, and deserving

When not in session with Jaclyn, parents and caregivers will have workshops on self-care, an adult adoptee panel, and a wrap-up of what their children experienced during the day.

Conference Details & Registration Information

Jockey Being Family Conference
Pieces of Me: The Puzzle of Identity
Saturday, September 27, 2014
9am-2pm
Country Springs Hotel
$40 per person/$70 per twosome
$10 per child
(adopted children only, ages 6-17)
Registration Deadline: September 11, 2014
 
Questions? Call 414-475-1246 or email info@coalitionforcyf.org

 

Upcoming Training: Talking Transitions

The Coalition

179032577Many children and adults find it challenging to deal with life changes. A person who was adopted may also experience these challenges, but to a greater degree due to their past, unknown history, or anxiety related to separation.

Permanency can be an ambiguous concept to people who have been adopted, so when a transition is around the corner, regardless of whether it’s minor or major, it can be a difficult time to process emotions. Please join us to learn how to identify triggers in children, what steps can be taken to reduce the anxiety, and how to smoothly transition children into new situations like school, new adults, new friends, new neighborhoods, new situations, etc.

About the Trainer
Jaclyn Skalnik, founder of Adoption Wellness, is also a transracial, internationally adopted person. Jaclyn earned a master’s degree in social work from the University of Wisconsin. She has assisted adoptive families throughout…

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World Wide Wednesday – July 23, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Let’s Talk! Respectful Adoption Language and Behavior: This handout developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics lists respectful ways pediatricians can discuss adoption with families, as well as language and phrases to avoid.
  • “I Feel Good that I Never Gave Up! At National Reunification Month events, parents reflect on the long road home. For June’s National Reunification Month, organizations around the country celebrated the perseverance and resilience of parents reunifying with children from foster care and of the professionals who support them.
  • You’ve got an open heart and an open mind, but are you ready to open your home? 5 Ways to Know You’re Ready to be a Foster Parent.

  • New fostercare.com website provides answers, support, volunteer options: KidsPeace recently launched a brand-new version of www.fostercare.com, an informative website aimed at supporting foster families and answering questions potential foster parents may have as they start their fostering journey. Log on today to hear from current foster parents, access information and support and find out about upcoming special events and other ways to get involved in your area.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, July 16, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • 8 Phrases Foster & Adopted Children Need to Hear: It’s from a place of anxiety and fear that children from hard places often enter our lives. With messages of hopelessness echoing in the recesses of our children’s minds, we can sometimes feel like our words, actions and intentions have little effect. Let me offer a little hope. I’ve seen significant improvement in my daughters behaviors, performance at school and self-confidence by simply changing the words that I speak over them.

    Here are 8 important phrases that our children need to hear from us….

  • 5 Facts Every Family Should Know about Challenging Behaviors

  • “The goodbyes certainly are not my favorite part of foster care. Sometimes in the healthiest of situations, foster parents are allowed to continue to be a part of a child’s life after they’ve moved on, but sadly that isn’t always the case.” What it’s like when a foster family says goodbye.
  • Mental Health Problems in Foster Care Children: Many children in the US foster care system have experienced trauma that can result in a diagnosable mental health disorder or symptoms that mimic one. This handout from Baylor College of Medicine, provides guidance to foster parents on how to prepare for doctor visits, recommends questions to ask the doctor, explains informed consent, and describes the steps the doctor will take in diagnosing and treating the child.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, July 9, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

174337705

  • Factsheet Offers Guidance on Helping Teens with Grief: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network offers a factsheet for caregivers to help teens who have experienced traumatic grief. The sheet helps caregivers know how to respond when teens are demonstrating signs of their grief.
  • Aging Out: Voices from Those in the Foster Care System – Their stories begin with heartbreak. A family unable or unwilling to care for them. Parents dead, addicted to drugs, absent.

    About 400,000 children in the U.S. live in foster care, according to federal officials. Entry into the foster care system is meant to keep them safe, but the reality is often fraught with its own dangers and disappointments. Times photojournalist Robert Gauthier interviewed more than a dozen young men and women from the Los Angeles area who were on the verge of being emancipated from foster care or had recently aged-out of “the system.”

    Many fight a daily battle to shed the label of “system kid.” Often they are ill-prepared to survive on their own, let alone succeed. They talked to The Times about their past, as well as their dreams for the future. Asked to describe themselves in one word, they answered “survivor,” “driven,” “adaptable.” View Aging Out Video

  • The Benefits of Including Foster Children in Your Vacation Plans: Many foster families feel that since foster children are a part of the family they should also be included in family vacation plans too. So, if you are deciding whether or not to include your foster child on your next family vacation, here are some of the pros of taking along your foster child. (Read the article.)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

Upcoming Training: Talking Transitions

179032577Many children and adults find it challenging to deal with life changes. A person who was adopted may also experience these challenges, but to a greater degree due to their past, unknown history, or anxiety related to separation.

Permanency can be an ambiguous concept to people who have been adopted, so when a transition is around the corner, regardless of whether it’s minor or major, it can be a difficult time to process emotions. Please join us to learn how to identify triggers in children, what steps can be taken to reduce the anxiety, and how to smoothly transition children into new situations like school, new adults, new friends, new neighborhoods, new situations, etc.

About the Trainer
Jaclyn Skalnik, founder of Adoption Wellness, is also a transracial, internationally adopted person. Jaclyn earned a master’s degree in social work from the University of Wisconsin. She has assisted adoptive families throughout their adoption process for nearly two decades. She has presented at global conferences on matters concerning adoption and is passionate about counseling adopted persons and adoptive families seeking support. Jaclyn is a licensed and Certified Advanced Practice Social Worker (CAPSW), a trained Hague Accreditation reviewer for the Council on Accreditation, a member of the National Association of Social Workers, a World of Diversity trainer, adoptive family homeland journey social worker, and has facilitated international birth-family searches and reunions.

Thursday, August 7, 2014
6-8 p.m.
$20/participant
$80/agency group
The Coalition for Children, Youth & Families
or attend via webinar
Register online, email us at into@coalitionforcyf.org, or call 414-475-1246