World Wide Wednesday, April 1, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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World Wide Wednesday, January 28, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  NACAC to Host Free Webinar on Advocating for Adoption Assistance. On February 2 at 2:00 p.m. central time, Josh Kroll, NACAC’s Adoption Subsidy Resource Center coordinator, will present Advocating for Adoption Assistance. During this free webinar, participants will learn how to advocate for adoption assistance programs in their state or province. In these tight financial times, legislators sometimes seek to cut adoption assistance programs and advocates need to be ready to respond. Even if your adoption assistance program is not under threat, proactive advocacy can help maintain and even enhance these important benefits for children who have special needs.
  • Look Through Their Eyes. The Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition’s Look Through Their Eyes campaign offers resources in English and Spanish to help parents and caregivers approach their child if they suspect they’ve experienced trauma.
  • The Potential Trauma of Family Tree Projects. Many adopted persons particularly in closed adoptions, cringe at the thought of creating a family tree that most students will have assigned to them in high school or college. The fear and discomfort from adoptees creating a family tree stems from not having access to their original birth certificate and not knowing their biological family history. Feelings of grief, abandonment, and loss are a few emotions that an adoptee can experience while trying to complete a family tree project. (Continue reading)
    The Coalition has a tip sheet on this topic, as well as a video that you may find helpful.
  • Giving voice to foster care alumni. Yasmin Mistry, a film animator and CASA volunteer, is working to raise the platform of foster care alumni. Mistry is heading the creation of a series of web videos where folks who’ve been through foster care simply share their recollections. It’s kind of a series of brief, video memoirs. They’re well-made, and certainly worth seeing.

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World Wide Wednesday, January 14, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  Youth in Foster Care Share Their School Experiences. In 12 fast-paced pages, this report shares the stories of 10 young people who faced constant hurdles and havoc while trying to advance their education in foster care.
  • The Post-Adoption Life: Supporting Adoptees, Birth Parents, and Families After Adoption. It’s important to recognize that adoption is a lifelong experience, and acknowledge the challenges for many of those touched by it. In the December 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, authors Kris Faasse, Sarah Horton Bobo, and Angela Magnuson outline some of the ways that adoption service providers can help adoptees, adoptive family members, and birth family members find and remain connected to vital, long-term support within the broader adoption community.
  • You Don’t Have to Adopt to Make a Huge Impact on the Life of a Foster Child. (Read the article.)
  • The Tax Realities of Adoption. While the children adopted in 2014 have brought joy to their adoptive families, they have also brought new tax realities for them. Here are some often asked questions about the Adoption Credit on federal income taxes.

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World Wide Wednesday, December 17, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

World Wide Wednesday

  • Grand Resources: A Grandparent’s and Other Relative’s Guide to Raising Children with Disabilities. Generations United developed this guide and resource directory to equip caregivers, including those that provide full- and part-time care to relative children, with the national resources they need to help their children thrive, now and in the future. The resource directory serves as a companion piece to the guide and provides a detailed list of the quality services, resources, information, and advocacy tools vital for children with disabilities.
  • Foster Parents Can Help Their Students Succeed in School. In order for a child in foster care to succeed in school, his foster parents must be leading the charge and blazing a path as his advocate, fighting for his every chance. In truth, it is likely that the foster student will have no other person fighting for him, as his caseworker’s work load is an overwhelming one, and his teachers may be too busy to reach out with information, or may not have the necessary information about the child that they need in order to meet his needs. Therefore, it is up to the foster parent to be proactive in the child’s life at school. (Continue reading.)
  • As foster parents, we must recognize our daily successes. We can all agree that we are much harder on ourselves than anyone else. We strive for perfection in our society, for getting it right the first time every time, and this only causes us to be critical of ourselves. What we often overlook is how much we are getting right and how many times we have succeeded. (Continue reading.)
  • Resources on the topic of sexual abuse. For a great new list of Child Sexual Abuse Resources, compiled by NCTSN, please click here.  These resources are available in Spanish and in English.

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World Wide Wednesday, November 19, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

World Wide Wednesday

  • The Potential Trauma of Family Tree Projects: Many adopted persons particularly in closed adoptions, cringe at the thought of creating a family tree that most students will have assigned to them in high school or college. The fear and discomfort from adoptees creating a family tree stems from not having access to their original birth certificate and not knowing their biological family history. Feelings of grief, abandonment, and loss are a few emotions that an adoptee can experience while trying to complete a family tree project.  Continue reading

  • Foster parents can help their students succeed in school: In order for a child in foster care to succeed in school, his foster parents must be leading the charge and blazing a path as his advocate, fighting for his every chance. In truth, it is likely that the foster student will have no other person fighting for him, as his caseworker’s work load is an overwhelming one, and his teachers may be too busy to reach out with information, or may not have the necessary information about the child that they need in order to meet his needs. Therefore, it is up to the foster parent to be proactive in the child’s life at school.
  • Foster Children and Celebrating Birthdays: Helping children in foster care enjoy and share memories while celebrating birthdays.
  • Fostering or Adopting? Two Critical Things Biological Children Need to Hear From YouOur biological daughter was 11 years old when we made the decision to add to our family through foster care adoption. To say that she was excited would be a gross understatement – she couldn’t wait to have a sister! At 11 years old she was extremely weary of being the only child. She had known for years that we couldn’t have any brothers or sisters. Adoption had always been an option we said we “might” do someday. So, by the time we asked her opinion of older child adoption through our state’s foster care system, she was our biggest supporter.

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World Wide Wednesday, November 5, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

World Wide Wednesday

  • The U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services have partnered to develop resources and guidance to support educators, child welfare professionals, and others in their work to improve the education and well-being outcomes for students in foster care. A dedicated webpage, Students in Foster Care, has been launched on the Department of Education’s website. This new webpage provides information on relevant laws, guidance, and technical assistance materials on topics ranging from the roles and responsibilities of child welfare and education agencies in ensuring the school stability of students in foster care to postsecondary education supports.
  • 6 Foster Care Skills You Need to Know Before Becoming a Foster Parent: The following 6 statements describe the basic knowledge base of successful foster parents. Of course there is more to being a foster parent, but these 6 points are a great place to start.
  • Families adopting older children via public or intercountry adoption face a unique set of challenges, as do the agencies that seek to serve and support them. In the October 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, former NCFA Legal Fellow Jamel Rowe collects and analyzes results from an older child adoption survey conducted in 2013 by Melissa Blauvelt and Rhonda Jarema. Participating adoptive families and adoption agencies identified several areas of concern, with a particular emphasis on pre-adoption preparation and post-adoption support.
  • Before You EXPLODE, Do This: A Simple Secret to Surviving the Tough Times in Foster Care and Adoption

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World Wide Wednesday, October 29, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

World Wide Wednesday

  • 8 Phrases Foster and Adopted Children Need to Hear: We’ve all seen Tarzan – the orphaned child raised by apes who spends his whole childhood thinking he’s an ape only to discover that he’s a man. As the movie unfolds we watch him suffer loss, rejection, fear, friendship, hope and love. Through his ups and downs we feel the tension of being caught between a world in which you do not fit but feel you belong and a world in which you do belong but don’t fit. Continue reading
  • Mental Health Problems of the Children in Foster Care: Many children in the US foster care system have experienced trauma that can result in a diagnosable mental health disorder or symptoms that mimic one. This handout from Baylor College of Medicine, provides guidance to foster parents on how to prepare for doctor visits, recommends questions to ask the doctor, explains informed consent, and describes the steps the doctor will take in diagnosing and treating the child.
  • For teachers and school administrators: With another school year well underway, it is important for teachers and school administrators to understand the impact of trauma, abuse, neglect, and other risk factors in a child’s history that can affect his or her ability to learn and feel safe and connected in the classroom. In the September 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, co-authors Casey Call, Karyn Purvis, Sheri R. Parris, and David Cross share the results from different schools employing Trust-Based Relationship Intervention® (TBRI®), and emphasize the power of safe, nurturing relationships in the classroom—particularly for children in from “hard places.”
  • Foster care homes needed for children of all ages: In Wisconsin, there were 137 children in foster care in Wood County in 2013; currently, in Portage County, 58 children are being served in 41 licensed foster homes. More than 5,100 foster homes in Wisconsin care for almost 8,000 foster children each year, according to the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families. “Given the quantity of families needing support services, our foster parents are at capacity,” said Danita Docka, the foster care coordinator for Portage County. Continue reading

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