World Wide Wednesday, March 4, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • Video: Family Reunites Adopted Daughter With Her Foster Sister.
  • Blog post: The Sons Who Were Never Really Mine
  • Input Sought from Transracial Adoptees: A researcher at the School of Social Work at St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas is seeking input from transracial adoptees from the U.S. who are 18 years old or older. The survey will explore the value that adoptive parents place on their child’s birth culture and ethnic identity and how it affects the child’s ethnic identity development and sense of belonging and acceptance.
  • Former Foster Youth Missing Out on New Health Care Benefits: A little-known clause of the Affordable Care Act that went into effect this January makes young adults who experienced foster care eligible to be insured until their 26th birthday. But according to this Youth Today article, many young people are not aware of the benefit. Read the article in Youth Today and see this tip sheet for child welfare advocates.

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World Wide Wednesday, August 27, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Finding Adoptive Families for Sibling Groups: This article from the National Resource Center for Adoption’s (NRCA) newsletter, The Roundtable, focuses on the importance of maintaining sibling connections when agencies seek prospective foster and adoptive families.  It highlights relevant policies and research related to sibling groups, and spotlights resources available from AdoptUSKids.
  • Foster youth face high risk of identity theft: Children in foster care are at greater risk of becoming victims of identity theft and entering adulthood with their credit already in shambles, experts say. Child advocates say that foster youth are particularly vulnerable to identity theft because they bounce from one home to another, giving an expanding group of adults access to their private information.
  • Expecting the Unexpected – Adopting a Child Age Two or Older: Parents of newborns, whether through adoption or birth, can follow a mostly predictable pattern. When the baby cries, he’s hungry, needs a new diaper, or is tired. If in doubt about a child-rearing point, parents can turn to countless books and websites, as well as family and friends. And each time they meet their child’s need, parents reinforce a mutual attachment. What happens, then, to children whose needs are not consistently met in their early months and years? Read the full article

  • Adoption Advocate No. 74 | Choosing an Adoption Agency: Adoption agencies have ethical and professional obligations to both expectant parents considering adoption and prospective adoptive parents. In the August issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, “Choosing an Adoption Agency,” NCFA president and CEO Chuck Johnson lists some considerations and questions for expectant parents and families to consider as they begin to research potential agencies.

 

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World Wide Wednesday – May 28, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • The Importance of Maintaining Sibling Connections in Foster Care: In the May 2014 National Foster Care Month issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, co-authors Dr. Robert White and Samantha Jernstrom explain the importance of maintaining sibling connections for youth in foster care. Research has shown that these connections can have a profound impact on the wellbeing of children in foster care. When sibling co-placement and the preservation of sibling groups is not possible, every effort should be made to help youth in care maintain strong, healthy, and supportive relationships with their brothers and sisters. Click here to download the PDF of Adoption Advocate No. 71.
  • Recipes for Success: Are you a foster care alumni or do you know one? EMK Press is looking for your recipes, food related stories, words of wisdom and advice for foster care youth for an upcoming book called Recipes for Success. Learn how to make a submission. 
  • States Enroll Former Foster Youth in Medicaid: One of the Affordable Care Act’s successes is a provision that allows young people up to 26 years old to remain on their parents’ health insurance. Under a similar, but less-known provision, young adults who have been recently released from foster care can also get Medicaid coverage, regardless of their incomes. An estimated 180,000 foster care alumni became eligible on Jan. 1. (Continue Reading)

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World Wide Wednesday, April 16, 2014

174337705It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • Why Are Lifebooks So Important?: What is a lifebook? A lifebook brings together a child’s past, present, and future. It is a book to document a child’s history, celebrate accomplishments, and allow his or her talents to shine. It is a record of a child’s life in his or her own words using photos, artwork, and things picked up along the way. It allows a child to honor life, one day and one event at a time. 
    Working together on a lifebook can bring a parent and child closer together. It creates a natural opportunity to talk about the circumstances of the foster care and/or adoptive placement. A lifebook is a useful tool in any stage of foster care or adoption. Other benefits include:
  • A lifebook is an easy tool to use to get to know a new child in your home. Working with the child to create pages that reflect his or her life will help you get to know the child better and build a relationship in the process.
  • A lifebook can help a child prepare to return to their birth family. You can help a child document and celebrate accomplishments while in care, and keep track of the important people in their life.
  • A lifebook can help prepare a child for adoption. You can work with the child to build a bridge between the birth family and the adoptive family.

    Iowa Foster and Adoptive Parents Association (IFAPA) has created over seventy FREE lifebook pages for families to use. IFAPA also has the entire lifebook translated into Spanish. All of these pages are available to download and print for free. VIEW LIFEBOOK PAGES

  • Youth Voices for Change: FindYouthInfo.gov created the Youth Engaged 4 Change website for teens and young adults who want to advocate for strengthening programs that improve outcomes for vulnerable youth. The website features voices of youth advocates or “Change Makers”; opportunities for internships, speaking engagements, conferences, and other events offered by the Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs; tools for building knowledge and skills for advocacy on an array of topics, including foster care, education, LGBTQ issues, bullying, and more; and a list of hotlines, publications, and other resources offering support.
  • My Family Matters Too: Imagine yourself as a child—taken away from your parents and separated from your siblings and then placed in a new home. This is not only scary, it can be confusing to children that do not understand why they are being taken away from the only homes that they know, regardless as to whether the homes were abusive or neglectful. Imagine yourself having all kinds of questions as to why you are being punished and taken away from your family, but no one answers. In this kind of situation, whom would you turn to for comfort? (Continue Reading)
  • The Importance of Relationships for Native American Families: Understanding the culture of my people is critical to bringing about systems change for Native American families. Relationships are an essential part of our traditional values and belief structure, which is where upon so many of our customs continue to be based. Reflecting upon, understanding, and honoring these cultural values when providing permanency-support services is essential to improving permanency outcomes for American Indian children and youth. (Continue Reading)

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