World Wide Wednesday, March 4, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • Video: Family Reunites Adopted Daughter With Her Foster Sister.
  • Blog post: The Sons Who Were Never Really Mine
  • Input Sought from Transracial Adoptees: A researcher at the School of Social Work at St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas is seeking input from transracial adoptees from the U.S. who are 18 years old or older. The survey will explore the value that adoptive parents place on their child’s birth culture and ethnic identity and how it affects the child’s ethnic identity development and sense of belonging and acceptance.
  • Former Foster Youth Missing Out on New Health Care Benefits: A little-known clause of the Affordable Care Act that went into effect this January makes young adults who experienced foster care eligible to be insured until their 26th birthday. But according to this Youth Today article, many young people are not aware of the benefit. Read the article in Youth Today and see this tip sheet for child welfare advocates.

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World Wide Wednesday, February 11, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • Complex Trauma: Facts for Caregivers. The National Child Traumatic Stress Network published a factsheet for parents and caregivers that defines complex trauma and its signs and symptoms, explains its effects, and provides recommendations for how parents can help their children build resilience and recover. The factsheet offers information about traumatic reminders— everyday incidents (sounds, smells, feelings) that cause a child to relive a traumatic event from his or her past. These triggers can cause overreactive behavior, intense anxiety, distraction and lack of focus, and other negative outcomes. Complex trauma can create irrational thinking and inaccurate perceptions related to the child’s relationship with a caregiver. Because caregivers can also experience feelings of frustration and helplessness, the factsheet outlines coping strategies and provides information on self-care.
  • Parenting Coach.  The Parenting Coach tool from Understood.org offers over 300 practical tips for parents. Parents can utilize this tool by visiting the link below and selecting their child’s age and one of the following challenges listed below. Select the challenge:
    • Transitioning From Task to Task
    • Getting Organized & Managing Time
    • Managing ADD/ADHD
    • Sticking With It & Not Giving Up Easily
    • Building Independence
    • Handling Frustration
    • Dealing with Anxiety & Fear
    • Taking Risks
    • Making Friends
    • Interacting with Kids
    • Interacting with Adults
    • Fitting In
    • Using Social Media & Technology
    • Problem Solving
    • Improving Self-Esteem
  • New Adoption PSAs. The Ad Council and Adopt US Kids are celebrating with two commercials the tenth anniversary of their joint campaign, started in 2004 to encourage adoption of kids in foster care. Both ads carry the tagline “You don’t have to be perfect to be a parent,” first used in 2011, but this time there’s the addition of two 1970s-style moustachioed crooners who narrate the tales of parenting mishaps in song.
  • Going to see Paddington? Check out the Adoption at the Movies review first.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

World Wide Wednesday, February 4, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  Foster Care: Loving a Child that Might Leave.
  • New Resources for Prospective Parents with Disabilities Posted on AdoptUSKids Website. A new section on the AdoptUSKids website provides resources for prospective parents with disabilities and features the story of a Colorado woman who adopted four children and is an advocate for parents with disabilities. Visit this new section
  • 101 Ways to Get Involved in Foster Care. For lovers of lists who also have an interest in foster care, this is my “Ultimate List of Opportunities” to get involved in helping vulnerable children and families, Connie Hayek writes. They are separated by general categories, but as you no doubt will notice, there is some overlap. Some suggestions may not apply to your community or your life circumstances. The good news is that with 101 included, you are sure to find something that fits.
  • 20 Ways to Prevent Child Abuse. Unrealistic expectations of parenthood, differences between what we want and what we actually have, a strained relationship with our marriage partner, too much to do and too little time, financial problems, drug abuse, alcoholism, and a history of being abused as a child are examples of problems that can cause parents to take out anger and frustration on their children. Even very loving parents can lose control to the point of child abuse. Here are some actions you can take to help children and their parents.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

World Wide Wednesday – September 17, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Adoption Assistance for Children Adopted from Foster Care: Describes how adoption assistance in the form of subsidies may help make adoption possible for families considering adopting a child from foster care. Also check out the Adoption Assistance by State page, too.
  • How Child Neglect Harms the Brain: Experts have long known that neglect and abuse in early life increase the risk of psychological problems, such as depression and anxiety, but now neuroscientists are explaining why. They’re showing how early maltreatment wreaks havoc on the developing brain.
  • Share this free book with your child’s teachers: This booklet was developed to provide educators with information about issues that impact foster and adoptive youth, the effects those issues might have on classroom learning and how educators can assist and advocate for these students.
  • Health Issues for Judges to Consider for Children in Foster Care: This resource from the AAP provides an overview of important health issues for children and youth in foster care. It includes downloadable, age-appropriate forms that can be shared with case workers and/or caregivers to obtain, record, and track relevant health information (physical, mental, developmental, behavioral, and dental) for a child in foster care in the hopes of obtaining improved outcomes.

    Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!