World Wide Wednesday – December 16, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • “The Love That Stayed” 
    The author fostered—and fell in love with—a little boy who was reunited with his birth family. Thirteen years later, she received an email that would turn her world upside down.
  • Part of bringing home a child from an institution or out-of-family care involves careful preparation.  When your new arrival has medical needs, the time to plan is before you travel!

    This week’s feature article, Top 5 Ways to Prepare for Bringing Home an Adoptive Child with Needs provides a checklist for families to consider and follow.

  • Illustration: We Never Outgrow the Need for Family – Children need love and encouragement throughout their lives.
  • “Of all the kids, they picked me!”
    At 15 years old, Crystalanne had given up on family. Until a couple in Texas spotted her profile on adoptuskids.org, and everything changed. Read her story.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

Inclusion in this post does not imply an endorsement by the Coalition for Children, Youth & Families. The Coalition is not responsible for the content of these resources.

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World Wide Wednesday, August 27, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Finding Adoptive Families for Sibling Groups: This article from the National Resource Center for Adoption’s (NRCA) newsletter, The Roundtable, focuses on the importance of maintaining sibling connections when agencies seek prospective foster and adoptive families.  It highlights relevant policies and research related to sibling groups, and spotlights resources available from AdoptUSKids.
  • Foster youth face high risk of identity theft: Children in foster care are at greater risk of becoming victims of identity theft and entering adulthood with their credit already in shambles, experts say. Child advocates say that foster youth are particularly vulnerable to identity theft because they bounce from one home to another, giving an expanding group of adults access to their private information.
  • Expecting the Unexpected – Adopting a Child Age Two or Older: Parents of newborns, whether through adoption or birth, can follow a mostly predictable pattern. When the baby cries, he’s hungry, needs a new diaper, or is tired. If in doubt about a child-rearing point, parents can turn to countless books and websites, as well as family and friends. And each time they meet their child’s need, parents reinforce a mutual attachment. What happens, then, to children whose needs are not consistently met in their early months and years? Read the full article

  • Adoption Advocate No. 74 | Choosing an Adoption Agency: Adoption agencies have ethical and professional obligations to both expectant parents considering adoption and prospective adoptive parents. In the August issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, “Choosing an Adoption Agency,” NCFA president and CEO Chuck Johnson lists some considerations and questions for expectant parents and families to consider as they begin to research potential agencies.

 

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday – May 21, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Moving to Adulthood: A Handout for Youth Aging Out of Foster Care – This handout from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Foster Care Alumni of America prepares older youth in care with tips for obtaining health records and securing health insurance.
  • Tips on Making Birth Family Interactions More Meaningful: Children enter foster care for many reasons. Frequently a child cannot safely return home for several months. Imagine being the biological parents and missing out on so many things. (Continue reading.)
  • New Department of Education Resource Available for Current and Former Foster Care Youth: Youth aging out of foster care may face many various challenges enrolling in college, including accessing accurate information about scholarships, financial aid, and other grants. The Department of Education has created a website to assist young people when they are thinking about attending college. It includes information and resources on preparing for college, types of financial aid available, eligibility for aid, applying for aid, and managing loans.
    http://studentaid.ed.gov/This one-page resource provides information about the Education and Training Voucher Program for youth currently and formerly in foster care.
  • Friendships, Social Skills, and Adoption: In our practice we see an unfortunate number of children with friendship problems. It can be one of the more painful issues that arise for our clients. But there is also hope – some good resources are available to help children with social skills difficulties, and there is much that parents can do to help. (Continue reading.)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, May 14, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Five Practical Steps Foster Parents Can Take in a Crisis: In Rhonda Sciortino’s work of protecting child welfare organizations over the past 25 years, she’s had the pleasure of meeting many wonderful people who are committed to helping good child caring providers. One such person is an attorney who has spent the last twenty years focusing on defending good foster parents following a tragedy or allegation. Gina Lacagnina, Esq. is with the law firm Neil, Dymott, Frank, McFall & Trexler in San Diego. Here is Gina’s best advice for foster parents.
  • Understanding Single Parent Adoption: With the number of adoptions by single men and women increasing over the past 10 years, advocates from A Love Beyond Borders produced a publication that addresses the rewards and challenges of single parent adoption.

    Single Parent Adoption: An Adoption Education Publication asserts that single parents ought to be considered by adoption agencies and birth mothers for their character, strength, and potential parenting capacity, rather than by their marital status. Statistically, domestic adoptions tend to favor couples over singles for placement, which leads many singles to opt for international adoption over domestic. The publication contests the underlying assumption that “all married couples will stay married, […] and all singles will forever remain single” and suggests that empathy for single persons’ need to nurture can enhance the potential for successful adoption for children.

  • Factsheet on Child Trauma: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) released a factsheet for child welfare and related professionals and the public with information about child traumatic stress. The factsheet defines child traumatic stress as the exposure to traumatic events. The resource also describes the consequences of child trauma and indicates that some children may not experience traumatic stress after a traumatic event; however, some children may experience significant reactions that interfere with their daily life and their ability to function or interact with others. Additional information details the extent of resources the NCTSN offers through its website, which include products, factsheets, training opportunities, and access to the latest research and resources on child traumatic stress.

  • Videos from the Attachment & Bonding Center: The Attachment and Bonding Center of Ohio emphasizes fostering connections between adopted children and their parents. The center provides a variety of resources to support families, including the following video talks:

  • Strengthen Your Forever Family: A Post-Adoption Guide, Adopting a child can be the most rewarding and joyful event of your life. It can also bring a unique set of challenges. Children who are adopted — regardless of their age at adoption or the type of adoption — may need help with behavioral, emotional, or developmental issues.

    As an adoptive parent, you have many resources you can rely on to help give your child the opportunity to thrive. This guide offers an overview of the post-adoption resources you may need and how to access them.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!