World Wide Wednesday – May 28, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • The Importance of Maintaining Sibling Connections in Foster Care: In the May 2014 National Foster Care Month issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, co-authors Dr. Robert White and Samantha Jernstrom explain the importance of maintaining sibling connections for youth in foster care. Research has shown that these connections can have a profound impact on the wellbeing of children in foster care. When sibling co-placement and the preservation of sibling groups is not possible, every effort should be made to help youth in care maintain strong, healthy, and supportive relationships with their brothers and sisters. Click here to download the PDF of Adoption Advocate No. 71.
  • Recipes for Success: Are you a foster care alumni or do you know one? EMK Press is looking for your recipes, food related stories, words of wisdom and advice for foster care youth for an upcoming book called Recipes for Success. Learn how to make a submission. 
  • States Enroll Former Foster Youth in Medicaid: One of the Affordable Care Act’s successes is a provision that allows young people up to 26 years old to remain on their parents’ health insurance. Under a similar, but less-known provision, young adults who have been recently released from foster care can also get Medicaid coverage, regardless of their incomes. An estimated 180,000 foster care alumni became eligible on Jan. 1. (Continue Reading)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

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World Wide Wednesday – May 21, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Moving to Adulthood: A Handout for Youth Aging Out of Foster Care – This handout from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Foster Care Alumni of America prepares older youth in care with tips for obtaining health records and securing health insurance.
  • Tips on Making Birth Family Interactions More Meaningful: Children enter foster care for many reasons. Frequently a child cannot safely return home for several months. Imagine being the biological parents and missing out on so many things. (Continue reading.)
  • New Department of Education Resource Available for Current and Former Foster Care Youth: Youth aging out of foster care may face many various challenges enrolling in college, including accessing accurate information about scholarships, financial aid, and other grants. The Department of Education has created a website to assist young people when they are thinking about attending college. It includes information and resources on preparing for college, types of financial aid available, eligibility for aid, applying for aid, and managing loans.
    http://studentaid.ed.gov/This one-page resource provides information about the Education and Training Voucher Program for youth currently and formerly in foster care.
  • Friendships, Social Skills, and Adoption: In our practice we see an unfortunate number of children with friendship problems. It can be one of the more painful issues that arise for our clients. But there is also hope – some good resources are available to help children with social skills difficulties, and there is much that parents can do to help. (Continue reading.)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

Training/Webinar: Life Books & Other Connection Strategies

154223440Keeping connections can be difficult for children and youth who experience many transitions in their lives. Foster and adoptive parents play an important role in helping maintain connections. Life books provide children and youth in care and youth who have been adopted with personal connections to their past.

A life book is much more than a scrapbook or a baby book. It is a personal account of a child’s life kept and maintained to help fill in the holes from his or her past. Foster and adoptive parents play an important role in providing support in the creation of life books, as well as using the life book as a healing tool. Creating a life book may feel like an overwhelming task because of a lack of information or personal items to include. Come find out more about inventive ways to create life books and how to overcome hurdles that may come up in the process.

In this training we will also discuss other tools and invite you to share what has worked for you in keeping connections for kids.

Please Note: This training will be discussion-based, not a hands-on creation of life books.  

Tuesday, May 27, 2014
6-8 p.m.
$10/participant or $40/agency group
Coalition for Children, Youth & Families
6682 W. Greenfield Avenue, Suite 310
Milwaukee, WI 53214
Or attend via webinar

Register online, contact info@coalitionforcyf.org, or call 414-475-1246.

World Wide Wednesday, May 14, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Five Practical Steps Foster Parents Can Take in a Crisis: In Rhonda Sciortino’s work of protecting child welfare organizations over the past 25 years, she’s had the pleasure of meeting many wonderful people who are committed to helping good child caring providers. One such person is an attorney who has spent the last twenty years focusing on defending good foster parents following a tragedy or allegation. Gina Lacagnina, Esq. is with the law firm Neil, Dymott, Frank, McFall & Trexler in San Diego. Here is Gina’s best advice for foster parents.
  • Understanding Single Parent Adoption: With the number of adoptions by single men and women increasing over the past 10 years, advocates from A Love Beyond Borders produced a publication that addresses the rewards and challenges of single parent adoption.

    Single Parent Adoption: An Adoption Education Publication asserts that single parents ought to be considered by adoption agencies and birth mothers for their character, strength, and potential parenting capacity, rather than by their marital status. Statistically, domestic adoptions tend to favor couples over singles for placement, which leads many singles to opt for international adoption over domestic. The publication contests the underlying assumption that “all married couples will stay married, […] and all singles will forever remain single” and suggests that empathy for single persons’ need to nurture can enhance the potential for successful adoption for children.

  • Factsheet on Child Trauma: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) released a factsheet for child welfare and related professionals and the public with information about child traumatic stress. The factsheet defines child traumatic stress as the exposure to traumatic events. The resource also describes the consequences of child trauma and indicates that some children may not experience traumatic stress after a traumatic event; however, some children may experience significant reactions that interfere with their daily life and their ability to function or interact with others. Additional information details the extent of resources the NCTSN offers through its website, which include products, factsheets, training opportunities, and access to the latest research and resources on child traumatic stress.

  • Videos from the Attachment & Bonding Center: The Attachment and Bonding Center of Ohio emphasizes fostering connections between adopted children and their parents. The center provides a variety of resources to support families, including the following video talks:

  • Strengthen Your Forever Family: A Post-Adoption Guide, Adopting a child can be the most rewarding and joyful event of your life. It can also bring a unique set of challenges. Children who are adopted — regardless of their age at adoption or the type of adoption — may need help with behavioral, emotional, or developmental issues.

    As an adoptive parent, you have many resources you can rely on to help give your child the opportunity to thrive. This guide offers an overview of the post-adoption resources you may need and how to access them.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, May 7, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Ten Tips for the First Year of Placement: Parents passionately want to succeed in raising emotionally healthy children. They also want to enjoy their little ones. When their children arrive later in infancy or childhood, most parents are well-aware that they are doing more careful parenting. They are nurturing not only to build a relationship, but to help mitigate any impact of losses or maltreatment.

    What are reasonable things for parents to concentrate on during the first year home? How can parents do the best to enjoy their children? They do not want the pleasures of parenting their children dimmed by a chorus of cautions. On the other hand, they do want to make that first year a great start. Here are my TOP TEN hits for a great start to your relationship with your baby or child.

    1. Spend ample time in nurturing activities. (Continue reading.)

  • The Role of Facilitators in Adoption: In the April 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, authors Karen S. Law, Esq. and Teresa McDonough, ACSW examine the recent rise in the use of unlicensed and typically unregulated adoption intermediaries or facilitators. They explain the significant risks for expectant parents and prospective parents who work with a facilitator as opposed to a licensed agency or attorney, and include a list of recommendations for those considering adoption.
  • A Day in the Life of One Foster Family.
  • Birthparent Issues of Grief and Loss: In this edition of Adoption Advocate, a publication from the National Council for Adoption (NCFA), the issues of grief and loss of birth parents are explored.  The publication discusses factors that can influence how an individual deals with loss, as well as the importance of considering the choice to parent; provides information on how grief manifests itself, on reconciling loss, and what practitioners and adoptive parents need to know; and offers some recommendations for practitioners to help birthparents.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!