World Wide Wednesday – January 27, 2016

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

Inclusion in this post does not imply an endorsement by the Coalition for Children, Youth & Families. The Coalition is not responsible for the content of these resources.

World Wide Wednesday – January 20, 2016

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • The January edition of Adoption Advocate is always dedicated to presenting NCFA’s policy priorities for the coming year and related legislation. NCFA rarely endorses specific legislation, but instead prioritizes educating key legislators and policymakers on the policies and practices that will provide essential services and the best possible support for children outside permanent family care, adopted individuals, birth parents, and adoptive families. As we outline our priorities in this article, we will also take the opportunity to mention current pending legislation related to those priorities.
  • How to Adopt from Foster Care
    Every one of the 107,918 children currently waiting in U.S. foster care deserves a stable, loving, permanent home. What about yours?
  • Facts about adopting an older child (above the age of three)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

Inclusion in this post does not imply an endorsement by the Coalition for Children, Youth & Families. The Coalition is not responsible for the content of these resources.

World Wide Wednesday – December 30, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • China’s New Two Child Policy – Will it impact intercountry adoption?
  • Recorded Webinar: We Never Outgrow the Need for Family
    This webinar
    from the Child Welfare Information Gateway highlighted the adoption story of Mary Lee Esq who inspired the creation of the Fostering Adoption to Further Student Achievement Act. It also showcased resources and tools for recruiting families for older youth, strategies to overcome common barriers to adoption, and examples of how to help older youth be open to the idea of being adopted.
  • Judge’s Rare Public Plea Finds Adoptive Family for Teen

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

Inclusion in this post does not imply an endorsement by the Coalition for Children, Youth & Families. The Coalition is not responsible for the content of these resources.

World Wide Wednesday – December 16, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  • “The Love That Stayed” 
    The author fostered—and fell in love with—a little boy who was reunited with his birth family. Thirteen years later, she received an email that would turn her world upside down.
  • Part of bringing home a child from an institution or out-of-family care involves careful preparation.  When your new arrival has medical needs, the time to plan is before you travel!

    This week’s feature article, Top 5 Ways to Prepare for Bringing Home an Adoptive Child with Needs provides a checklist for families to consider and follow.

  • Illustration: We Never Outgrow the Need for Family – Children need love and encouragement throughout their lives.
  • “Of all the kids, they picked me!”
    At 15 years old, Crystalanne had given up on family. Until a couple in Texas spotted her profile on adoptuskids.org, and everything changed. Read her story.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

Inclusion in this post does not imply an endorsement by the Coalition for Children, Youth & Families. The Coalition is not responsible for the content of these resources.

World Wide Wednesday, January 21, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  Life after foster care: Mentors help teens prepare. “Having someone to love you and all that stuff — I don’t get that.”

    Felix Louis Rivera Medina spoke with a shrug, a matter-of-fact gesture about his life. He is 18 years old and about to age out of Brown County’s foster care system. He has never had a stable home, has been in and out of jail, has no contact with his parents. (Continue reading.)

  • Helping adopted children cope with grief and loss. Adoption involves loss. Resources in this section can help families understand and help their adopted children deal with the loss and grief associated with adoption.
  • Adoption at the Movies. “Annie”

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

World Wide Wednesday, January 7, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  New Website: Advocates for Families First. This organization provides information, direct technical assistance, one-on-one and group education to developing or existing foster, adoptive or kinship family support, and advocacy organizations. Their mission is to build a unified national movement in support of kinship, foster, and adoptive families who care for children and youth, promote their healing, and help them thrive.
  • Trauma Informed Care: New Online Tool. The Georgetown University, National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health  and others have recently completed a new free online tool entitled, Trauma Informed Care: Perspectives and Resources. The tool aims to support state and local decision-makers, administrators, providers, parents, and youth and family advocates to become more trauma informed. It includes video interviews, issue briefs, key resources and links that will be updated monthly to keep up with new developments in the field. This FREE tool is now live and available for your use.
  • PATHS Program Helps Transition to Adulthood after Foster Care. Nineteen-year-old Brianna Deprey, of Algoma, Wisconsin, is getting help on her way to independence thanks to a new federally funded four-county pilot program. When Deprey was growing up, her grandmother obtained court-ordered kinship custody due to problems with alcohol and substance abuse in her home. Now that she is a young adult, she has yet to find a stable home environment. (Continue reading.)
  • Adoptive Parents Need to be Supported to Help Their Child Grieve for the Past. Children in the adoptive system will have suffered separation, loss and trauma. The child’s “journey” through this process is explained first to adopters and then to children, when they reach maturity, through court reports produced by social workers. The creation of a “life story” book with this information in can help the child understand what has happened to them, where they have lived, who has cared for them and the decisions that have happened in their lives. (Continue reading.)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

World Wide Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Before we get to this week’s World Wide Wednesday post, we’d like to wish a very Merry Christmas to all those who celebrate!

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

World Wide Wednesday

  • The Joys and Challenges of Parenting Older Adopted Children. Children adopted at older ages—especially those from the U.S. foster care system—typically come to their new families with some history of trauma, abuse, or neglect, and a storehouse of unresolved emotions. But adopting and parenting older children comes with unique joys and rewards as well as challenges. In the November 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, psychologist and adoptive father Dr. Gary Matloff discusses and shares valuable tips for families that have welcomed older children through adoption.
  • 6 Questions Every Adopted Teen Wants Answered. As children reach the teen years, the simple adoption stories of their early years no longer suffice. In this excerpt from Beneath the Mask: Understanding Adopted Teens, we take a look at what goes on in the minds of teens, and offer advice for talking with them. (Continue reading.)
  • Start Talking. Not sure when—or how—to bring up adoption with your toddler or preschooler? Here’s where to begin.
  • Adoption at the Movies. Big Hero 6.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!