World Wide Wednesday, January 28, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  NACAC to Host Free Webinar on Advocating for Adoption Assistance. On February 2 at 2:00 p.m. central time, Josh Kroll, NACAC’s Adoption Subsidy Resource Center coordinator, will present Advocating for Adoption Assistance. During this free webinar, participants will learn how to advocate for adoption assistance programs in their state or province. In these tight financial times, legislators sometimes seek to cut adoption assistance programs and advocates need to be ready to respond. Even if your adoption assistance program is not under threat, proactive advocacy can help maintain and even enhance these important benefits for children who have special needs.
  • Look Through Their Eyes. The Illinois Childhood Trauma Coalition’s Look Through Their Eyes campaign offers resources in English and Spanish to help parents and caregivers approach their child if they suspect they’ve experienced trauma.
  • The Potential Trauma of Family Tree Projects. Many adopted persons particularly in closed adoptions, cringe at the thought of creating a family tree that most students will have assigned to them in high school or college. The fear and discomfort from adoptees creating a family tree stems from not having access to their original birth certificate and not knowing their biological family history. Feelings of grief, abandonment, and loss are a few emotions that an adoptee can experience while trying to complete a family tree project. (Continue reading)
    The Coalition has a tip sheet on this topic, as well as a video that you may find helpful.
  • Giving voice to foster care alumni. Yasmin Mistry, a film animator and CASA volunteer, is working to raise the platform of foster care alumni. Mistry is heading the creation of a series of web videos where folks who’ve been through foster care simply share their recollections. It’s kind of a series of brief, video memoirs. They’re well-made, and certainly worth seeing.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

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NEW Training: Having Critical Conversations with Children and Youth about Racism

Racism can take on a lot of forms: a youth being harassed at school, a person not getting a job because of their name, someone dismissing a story or incident, ignoring cultural norms, obvious and subtle, even through seemingly innocent questions.

This is a topic that can come up for all families and can sometimes be hard to address – especially what to do for and say to the youth in your care. This topic, while sensitive and at times uncomfortable, remains important. Join us as we learn about addressing racism with the youth in your care, advocating on their behalf and what you can do to start the conversation in your home.

On Thursday, February 26, the Coalition will be hosting a training on this topic – Having Critical Conversations with Children and Youth about Racism. We hope you can join us and trainer Warren Scherer as we learn about how you can start the conversation in your home and how you can advocate on the behalf of children and youth you care for.

You can learn more and register by clicking on the link above.

World Wide Wednesday, January 21, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  Life after foster care: Mentors help teens prepare. “Having someone to love you and all that stuff — I don’t get that.”

    Felix Louis Rivera Medina spoke with a shrug, a matter-of-fact gesture about his life. He is 18 years old and about to age out of Brown County’s foster care system. He has never had a stable home, has been in and out of jail, has no contact with his parents. (Continue reading.)

  • Helping adopted children cope with grief and loss. Adoption involves loss. Resources in this section can help families understand and help their adopted children deal with the loss and grief associated with adoption.
  • Adoption at the Movies. “Annie”

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

World Wide Wednesday, January 14, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  Youth in Foster Care Share Their School Experiences. In 12 fast-paced pages, this report shares the stories of 10 young people who faced constant hurdles and havoc while trying to advance their education in foster care.
  • The Post-Adoption Life: Supporting Adoptees, Birth Parents, and Families After Adoption. It’s important to recognize that adoption is a lifelong experience, and acknowledge the challenges for many of those touched by it. In the December 2014 issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, authors Kris Faasse, Sarah Horton Bobo, and Angela Magnuson outline some of the ways that adoption service providers can help adoptees, adoptive family members, and birth family members find and remain connected to vital, long-term support within the broader adoption community.
  • You Don’t Have to Adopt to Make a Huge Impact on the Life of a Foster Child. (Read the article.)
  • The Tax Realities of Adoption. While the children adopted in 2014 have brought joy to their adoptive families, they have also brought new tax realities for them. Here are some often asked questions about the Adoption Credit on federal income taxes.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

World Wide Wednesday, January 7, 2015

iStock_000003621765_LargeIt’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s news in the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

  •  New Website: Advocates for Families First. This organization provides information, direct technical assistance, one-on-one and group education to developing or existing foster, adoptive or kinship family support, and advocacy organizations. Their mission is to build a unified national movement in support of kinship, foster, and adoptive families who care for children and youth, promote their healing, and help them thrive.
  • Trauma Informed Care: New Online Tool. The Georgetown University, National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health  and others have recently completed a new free online tool entitled, Trauma Informed Care: Perspectives and Resources. The tool aims to support state and local decision-makers, administrators, providers, parents, and youth and family advocates to become more trauma informed. It includes video interviews, issue briefs, key resources and links that will be updated monthly to keep up with new developments in the field. This FREE tool is now live and available for your use.
  • PATHS Program Helps Transition to Adulthood after Foster Care. Nineteen-year-old Brianna Deprey, of Algoma, Wisconsin, is getting help on her way to independence thanks to a new federally funded four-county pilot program. When Deprey was growing up, her grandmother obtained court-ordered kinship custody due to problems with alcohol and substance abuse in her home. Now that she is a young adult, she has yet to find a stable home environment. (Continue reading.)
  • Adoptive Parents Need to be Supported to Help Their Child Grieve for the Past. Children in the adoptive system will have suffered separation, loss and trauma. The child’s “journey” through this process is explained first to adopters and then to children, when they reach maturity, through court reports produced by social workers. The creation of a “life story” book with this information in can help the child understand what has happened to them, where they have lived, who has cared for them and the decisions that have happened in their lives. (Continue reading.)

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!