World Wide Wednesday – September 17, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Adoption Assistance for Children Adopted from Foster Care: Describes how adoption assistance in the form of subsidies may help make adoption possible for families considering adopting a child from foster care. Also check out the Adoption Assistance by State page, too.
  • How Child Neglect Harms the Brain: Experts have long known that neglect and abuse in early life increase the risk of psychological problems, such as depression and anxiety, but now neuroscientists are explaining why. They’re showing how early maltreatment wreaks havoc on the developing brain.
  • Share this free book with your child’s teachers: This booklet was developed to provide educators with information about issues that impact foster and adoptive youth, the effects those issues might have on classroom learning and how educators can assist and advocate for these students.
  • Health Issues for Judges to Consider for Children in Foster Care: This resource from the AAP provides an overview of important health issues for children and youth in foster care. It includes downloadable, age-appropriate forms that can be shared with case workers and/or caregivers to obtain, record, and track relevant health information (physical, mental, developmental, behavioral, and dental) for a child in foster care in the hopes of obtaining improved outcomes.

    Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday – September 10, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Essay: There’s more than enough love in America to solve the foster care crisis.

  • Parenting a Child Who Has Been Sexually Abused: This factsheet discusses how foster and adoptive parents can help children and adolescents who have experienced sexual abuse. It provides basic information about sexual abuse and links to other information so that parents can educate themselves about the topic. The factsheet suggests ways to establish guidelines for safety and privacy in the family, and it offers suggestions about when to seek professional help and where to find such help.
  • Kid Hero blog post: Foster Care – It’s a Challenge Worth Taking.
  • Intercounty Adoption: Where Do I Start?: This factsheet provides an overview of the intercountry adoption process. Depending on your State, your adoption services provider, and the country from which you adopt, the steps in this adoption process may vary and may change over time. For example, some families will first select an adoption services provider; others will choose a country first. Meeting the legal requirements and then bringing your child home and adjusting to your new family are all covered in this factsheet.

    Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, September 3, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Complex Trauma – Facts for Caregivers: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Complex Trauma Collaborative Group has developed this new factsheet designed specifically for caregivers, which provides information on how a caregiver can support a child with a complex trauma history. It presents information that can help a caregiver understand complex trauma and recognize the signs and symptoms of complex trauma in their child. It also offers recommendations for what the caregiver can do to help their child heal, as well as tips for self care.
  • From the Kid Hero Blog: 5 Changes I Made to Save My Foster Parent Sanity.

  • It’s back to school time! The Iowa Foster & Adoptive Parents Association (IFAPA) has dedicated an entire issue of their Weekly Word newsletter to helping parents get prepared for the upcoming school year. Don’t have a school-aged child? The issue also contains excellent resources for those parenting children ages birth to five.
  • Curious about some new releases at the movie theater and how they relate to adoption? Check out some adoption movie guides for films including Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Hundred-Foot Journey.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, August 27, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Finding Adoptive Families for Sibling Groups: This article from the National Resource Center for Adoption’s (NRCA) newsletter, The Roundtable, focuses on the importance of maintaining sibling connections when agencies seek prospective foster and adoptive families.  It highlights relevant policies and research related to sibling groups, and spotlights resources available from AdoptUSKids.
  • Foster youth face high risk of identity theft: Children in foster care are at greater risk of becoming victims of identity theft and entering adulthood with their credit already in shambles, experts say. Child advocates say that foster youth are particularly vulnerable to identity theft because they bounce from one home to another, giving an expanding group of adults access to their private information.
  • Expecting the Unexpected – Adopting a Child Age Two or Older: Parents of newborns, whether through adoption or birth, can follow a mostly predictable pattern. When the baby cries, he’s hungry, needs a new diaper, or is tired. If in doubt about a child-rearing point, parents can turn to countless books and websites, as well as family and friends. And each time they meet their child’s need, parents reinforce a mutual attachment. What happens, then, to children whose needs are not consistently met in their early months and years? Read the full article

  • Adoption Advocate No. 74 | Choosing an Adoption Agency: Adoption agencies have ethical and professional obligations to both expectant parents considering adoption and prospective adoptive parents. In the August issue of NCFA’s Adoption Advocate, “Choosing an Adoption Agency,” NCFA president and CEO Chuck Johnson lists some considerations and questions for expectant parents and families to consider as they begin to research potential agencies.

 

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

World Wide Wednesday, August 20, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • African American Hair Care Styling Tips: Looking for some simple hair care tips, including washing, combing and braiding? View step-by-step instructions

  • Questions to Ask Before Accepting a Placement: The Iowa Foster and Adoptive Parent Association’s Pre-Placement Questionnaire contains a list of questions to ask before agreeing to the placement of a child into your home. There will be times and circumstances when a worker has limited information about the child they need to place. When information is available, however, it will help you determine if the child will be a good fit for your family and your parenting abilities. This list can be a helpful resource for obtaining information. You might want to have a copy readily available to refer to when you get a call about a possible placement. View the questionnaire

  • 4 Dos and Don’ts When Welcoming a New Foster Child into Your Home: The arrival of a foster child in your house can be a time of excitement, as well as anxiety. The phone call from a caseworker asking if you would like a foster child placed in your home can leave you in a state of apprehension. It is often a time of questions, from you and your family, as well as from the foster child. For the child coming into your home, it is especially an intimidating period. Remember, this new foster child is being moved, against his/her wishes, to a strange home and to an unknown family. While each child is unique, it is difficult to predict how each new foster child will react to this sudden and extreme change. Yet, with a little preparation and planning, you can ease the stress that is sure to occur during this transition.
     
  • Complex Trauma: Facts for Caregivers The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Complex Trauma Collaborative Group has developed this new factsheet designed specifically for caregivers, which provides information on how a caregiver can support a child with a complex trauma history. It presents information that can help a caregiver understand complex trauma and recognize the signs and symptoms of complex trauma in their child. It also offers recommendations for what the caregiver can do to help their child heal, as well as tips for self care.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!

 

Upcoming Training: Recharge Your Batteries

469509271“Self-care” is a term you have probably heard many times. Most likely, you already know what it means. But, unfortunately, taking care of yourself doesn’t always happen; especially during stressful times, which is when it is needed most.

Given all that there is to do in any given day, taking care of yourself can sometimes feel like one more thing you have to add or try to fit into your schedule. As a result, if you don’t do it or can’t make time for it, you could run the risk of feeling like you’ve failed. Taking care of yourself can often feel like it is easier said than done.

Join our discussion to learn the reasons self-care is especially important for kinship caregivers, foster and adoptive parents, ideas for taking care of yourself, finding ways to fit self-care into your busy schedule, and getting support from others to help make sure self-care happens.

About the Trainer

Maureen Heffernan is a child welfare consultant and trainer. She works on a national level with the National Resource Center for Diligent Recruitment and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. She is also a regular trainer in the Ohio Child Welfare Training program and a member of the Board of Directors of the Ohio Family Care Association. Maureen is committed to supporting kinship, foster and adoptive families and has trained families on numerous foster care and adoption topics.

 

Recharge Your Batteries: Self-Care for Parents & Caregivers Running on Empty

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
6-8 p.m.

$20/person or $80/agency group

Attend in person at the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites Wausau-Rothschild (1000 Imperial Avenue, Rothschild, WI 54474) or attend via webinar.

Register online, email us at info@coalitionforcyf.org or call 414-475-1246 (Toll Free: 800-762-8063)

World Wide Wednesday, August 13, 2014

It’s World Wide Wednesday! Here’s what’s happening the world of foster care and adoption around the web:

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  • Free Book from Iowa Foster & Adoption Parent Association: As a foster parent you have a critical role to play in the life of a child. Not only are you responsible for the child’s day-to-day care, but because you spend so much time caring for and observing them, you are able to provide the Department of Human Services (DHS), and the court with valuable information that is needed to make important decisions regarding the child’s welfare. One of the important needs of a child placed in foster care is the need to receive permanency timely. Juvenile court and DHS have the responsibility to assist the birth family in rectifying the problems that led to the removal of the child, allowing the child to return home safely.

    The Foster Parents and the Courts booklet was written in order to help you understand the court process. It will provide you with valuable
    information about your rights and responsibilities, the role of key participants in the court process, and how you can be most effective in advocating for the best interests of the children in your care.

  • Building Relationships Between Adoptive and Birth Families: This factsheet from the Child Welfare Information Gateway is designed
    to support adoptive families who are considering and/or maintaining open adoption. It describes open adoption and various levels of openness, trends towards increasing openness, and the potential benefits of open adoption. It also offers strategies to build and maintain relationships with their children’s birth families.
  • Visitation Tips for Foster Parents: Healthy Foster Care America shares some tips to help children and teens before and after a visit with the birth family. Read reasons why a child might be in extreme distress before or after a visit and what you can do to help prepare them before a visit and how to transition back from a visit.

Have news you’d like to share? Please post in our comments!